Homeschooling

Best States to Homeschool Children



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Deciding which states are the best for homeschooling in the United States is really a subjective choice determined by individual criteria. For one family the choice be a state that allows them full freedom regarding how they choose to educate their child, while another family may believe a state with stringent standards that insures children are receiving an adequate education is the best.

Ten States require the parents give no notice when choosing to homeschool their children. For those looking for complete control over how they will educate their children, these would be considered the best states to homeschool in. The laws still vary by state however making some states more desirable than other states. The 10 states with the least homeschool requirements are:

Alaska Connecticut Idaho Indiana Michigan Missouri New Jersey Oklahoma Texas

On the other end of the spectrum, we have 6 states that hold rigid requirements for those who wish to homeschool their children. With parents required to provide notice that they are educating their children at home, keep adequate records, teach specific subjects and in some cases hold a teacher certification, these states could be considered the best for a home education as the parents are held accountable for providing their children with an adequate education. States requiring more compliance from families wishing to homeschool are:

Massachusetts New York North Dakota Pennsylvania Rhode Island Vermont

Of course, those families residing in any of the 36 states not previously listed could potentially be living a state that is best for homeschooling as these states provide a balance between the complete freedom of less restrictive states and the hard-core compliance required by the highly regulated states. These states may require a parent report that they intend to educate their child at home and provide samples of the child’s work yearly for review, but still allow the parent to choose the subjects that will be taught and for how long.

The choice of what state is best for homeschooling really relies on the parent’s decision for choosing to homeschool their child as well as what type of education they wish their child to obtain. A parent that wants to unschool and spend their time visiting museums, historical sites and letting their child learn naturally will find it difficult to comply with the standards of the stringent states. Additionally, someone who needs structure may not benefit from a state that requires nothing from him or her to help keep him or her accountable.

 

More about this author: Jessica Sanders-Parmer

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